The journal History of Science in South Asia has this to say, when outlining its scope:

We take "science" to be broadly conceived, and to include all forms of rigorous intellectual activity that adopt at least to some extent a quantitative and empirical approach, as in the German "Die Wissenschaft," that covers most forms of academic scholarship. Theoretical discussions of the meaning of "science" in the South Asian context are welcome. They should presuppose some familiarity with topics such as those raised in sources like Grant, A History of Natural Philosophy (2007), Latour, Laboratory Life (1979), Staal, Concepts of Science in Europe and Asia (1993, PDF), Shapin, "Science and the Modern World" (2007, PDF), Netz, The Shaping of Deduction (2003, PDF of review by Latour), Pollock, "The Languages of Science in Early-Modern India" (in Forms of Knowledge in Early Modern Asia, 2011), and similar reflective works that explore Global History, the interpretation of Modernities, and the general meaning of science in the pre-modern world.

Factual articles reporting discoveries, or interpretative revisions, are also welcome, as are editions and translations of science texts in the languages South Asia.

Best,
Dominik Wujastyk

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