<html>
  <head>

    <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8">
  </head>
  <body>
    <p>Dear Listmembers,<br>
      the Sambulā-Jātaka (519) is illustrated at a monastery Sri Lanka.
      Sambulā takes care of her leprosy husband Sotthisena in the
      forest. A demon falls in love and tries to catch her but Śakra
      rescues her.  The corresponding mural depicts Śakra as a terrible
      being holding a club in his hands. The Pali Jātaka provides no
      description of a disguised Śakra but in the Sinhalese
      Sambulā-Jātaka we can read, that Śakra saves Sambulā in the
      disguise of a terrible being (...<i>Sakdevraja bhayānaka vēṣayak
        geṇa</i> ...). I suppose this is recorded in a source of the
      Mūlasarvāstivāda-Vinaya tradition, written in Sanskrit or Tibetan.
      <br>
      Anyone of you came across a similar version of this story, where
      Śakra saves Sambulā in a terrible disguise?<br>
      <br>
      Thank you<br>
      <br>
      Heiner</p>
    <p>Rolf Heinrich Koch<br>
    </p>
    <pre class="moz-signature" cols="72">-- 
<a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="http://www.rolfheinrichkoch.wordpress.com">www.rolfheinrichkoch.wordpress.com</a></pre>
  </body>
</html>