<div dir="ltr">Dear all,<br><br>

<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:10pt;line-height:115%;font-family:"arial unicode ms","sans-serif"">Speaking of jñāna (with pranams to young Edith
Fuller), I am trying to find the original Sanskrit for the etymological
definition of jñāna given by Candragomin in his commentary on the <i>Mañjuśrī-nāma-saṃgīti</i>, verse 84, or
verse 8 of chapter 8. This commentary seems to be extant only in its Tibetan
translation, where this reference is found in the Comparative Tengyur, vol. 24,
p. 1426, line 5. There, in commenting on the compound term jñānābhiṣeka,
Candragomin gives what appears to be an etymological definition of jñāna: ye
shes ni ye nas gnas pa’i don shes pa’o. The sense of this Tibetan phrase was
given by the late Edward Henning as: “the cognition of the primordial
nature/reality” (<a href="http://kalacakra.org/kalaskt.htm">http://kalacakra.org/kalaskt.htm</a>, side box midway down). <br></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:10pt;line-height:115%;font-family:"arial unicode ms","sans-serif""><br></span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:10pt;line-height:115%;font-family:"arial unicode ms","sans-serif"">Here, jñāna is taken in its meaning as a
Buddhist technical term, for higher knowledge or wisdom or cognition or
awareness. Thus it is translated into Tibetan as ye shes, as opposed to its
common meaning as knowledge in general, where it is translated into Tibetan as
shes pa. The definition begins with ye nas, for which I have not found a Sanskrit
equivalent. It means “from the beginning,” or "primordial." The next word,
gnas pa, typically translates Sanskrit words from the root sthā, so means something
like “established, existing.” The following word, don, usually translates the
Sanskrit word artha, and here probably means “object” rather than “meaning.”
The last word, shes pa, as already said can translate jñāna as knowledge, or
other Sanskrit words from the root jñā and their synonyms. This includes verbals
such as jñāta and verbs such as jñāyate.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:10pt;line-height:115%;font-family:"arial unicode ms","sans-serif""><br></span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:10pt;line-height:115%;font-family:"arial unicode ms","sans-serif"">I have checked the several existing Sanskrit commentaries
on the <i>Amarakośa</i>, where jñāna occurs
at 1.5.6. They had nothing close to this. I would be very glad to have the
original Sanskrit for this definition of jñāna.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:10pt;line-height:115%;font-family:"arial unicode ms","sans-serif""><br></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:10pt;line-height:115%;font-family:"arial unicode ms","sans-serif"">Best regards,</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:10pt;line-height:115%;font-family:"arial unicode ms","sans-serif""><br></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:10pt;line-height:115%;font-family:"arial unicode ms","sans-serif"">David Reigle</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:10pt;line-height:115%;font-family:"arial unicode ms","sans-serif"">Colorado, U.S.A.<br></span></p>

</div>