[INDOLOGY] The Sun as the "21st"

Dipak Bhattacharya dipak.d2004 at gmail.com
Fri Mar 18 12:39:58 EDT 2016


Dear Colleague,
With due respect to Professor Thieme, a different explanation might not be
uncalled for. Perhaps we talked over this sometime adducing information on
publications. Thieme's memory is indelible - a rare combinartion of
scholarship and humility. So I do not like to further extend my replies.
Best wishes
Dipak Bhattacharya

On Fri, Mar 18, 2016 at 6:03 PM, Joanna Jurewicz <j.jurewicz at uw.edu.pl>
wrote:

> In the Ṛgveda this number is often activated via the phrase 'tríḥ saptá'.
> See Thieme P. 1985. ‘The First Verse of the *Tri**ṣ**aptīyam* (AV, Ś 1.1
> ~ AV, P 1.6) and the Beginnings of Sanskrit Linguistics’. *Journal of the
> American Oriental Society* 105, 3: 559-565.
> Best,
> Joanna
>
>
>
> ---
> dr hab. Joanna Jurewicz, prof. UW
> Katedra Azji Południowej /Chair of South Asia
> Wydział Orientalistyczny / Faculty of Oriental Studies
> Uniwersytet Warszawski /University of Warsaw
> ul. Krakowskie Przedmieście 26/28
> 00-927 Warszawa
> https://uw.academia.edu/JoannaJurewicz
>
> 2016-03-18 12:07 GMT+01:00 Dipak Bhattacharya <dipak.d2004 at gmail.com>:
>
>> 21 is a holy number pertaining, originally, to the twenty-one
>> declensional forms of word --the three-into-seven declensional forms. The
>> matter is not undiscussed.
>> Best
>> DB
>>
>> On Fri, Mar 18, 2016 at 2:58 PM, James Hartzell <james.hartzell at gmail.com
>> > wrote:
>>
>>> Dear Colleagues
>>>
>>> I’ve come across two references in the Brāhmaṇas to the Sun as ‘the
>>> twenty-first’ –
>>>
>>> ŚB 6.7.1.1: …” It (the plate) is round, for he (the Sun) is round. It
>>> has twenty-one knobs, for he is the twenty-first. He wears it with the
>>> knobs outside, for the knobs are his (the Sun's) rays, and his rays are
>>> outside." (Eggeling 1894:265),”
>>> and
>>> AB 4.18: "They perform the ceremonies of the Ekaviṃśa day, which is the
>>> equator, dividing the year (into two equal parts). By means of the
>>> performance of this day, the gods had raised the Sun up to the heavens.
>>> This Ekaviṃśa day on which the Divākīrtya mantra (was produced) is preceded
>>> by ten days, and followed by ten days, and is in the midst (of both
>>> periods). On both sides it is thus put in a Virāṭ: (the number ten). Being
>>> thus put in a Virāṭ (in the number ten) on both sides, this (Ekaviṃśa, i.e.
>>> the Sun) becomes not disturbed in his course through these worlds." (Haug
>>> 1977:288-289).
>>>
>>> Does anyone have other references to the Sun as the 21st, and any other
>>> explanations for this other than these two Brahmana explanations?
>>>
>>> Cheers
>>>
>>> James Hartzell, PhD(2x)
>>> Center for Mind/Brain Sciences (CIMeC)
>>> The University of Trento, Italy
>>>
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>>
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