AIT, NEW genetic evidence

Paul Kekai Manansala kekai at JPS.NET
Wed Jan 12 02:53:31 EST 2000


Samar Abbas wrote:
>
>
> Moreover, what to make of the following table ?
>
> > Frequency of Ddel(10,394)Alul(10,397)Haplotypes in Punjab
> >                      ++         +-         --
> >              no.     (%)        (%)        (%)
> >  _________________________________________________________
> > Caucasoids        383     1.0        21.4        77.6
> > Punjabi            78     26.9       12.8        60.2
> > Tribals (A.P.)     30     60.0        0          40.0
> > East Asians       153     44.4        7.2        48.4
> > Sub-Sah. African  197      1.5       88.7         9.6
>
>  This shows a negligible Caucasoid contribution, even to Punjabi
> populations.

There is a fairly high presence of -- in Punjabis.

It has been suggested that this and Dr.N.Mahajan's citations
> negate an "Aryan invasion"; before `OIT' advocates celebrate they should
> realise that these papers negate any major Indo-Caucasoid presence itself.
> Simply put, the papers indicate that there are genetically speaking no
> `Indo-Aryans' in India. So, bad news for both AIT as well as OIT. Of
> course, this is just part of the data.
>


Yes, just from the maternal side.


> > A newer publication deals with mtDNA haplotype M, which was formerly
> > thought of as Asian origin, but which now may be connected with the
> > first migration out of Ethiopia, and strangely enough into India!
>
>  This seems to imply that the first Africoid migration into India occurred not from Sudan (as suggested by Sergent) but from Ethiopia (presumably via the Yemen). Or did Ethiopians (presumably `Hamites') inhabit the Sudan prior to the advent of Sudanics ?
>

Haplotype M must have crossed over into Yemem because there aren't many
traces of it in the Levant.


> > Regarding Y chromosomes, global studies have placed South Asians in a
> > cluster with Southeast Asians.
>
> This Southeast Asiatic contribution may come from `Naga'+`Kirata'
> immigrations which are attested in ancient texts. Strange also, that they
> left little mark in linguistic terms - even East India is IA. Has this
> contribution been overlooked, or has the research been neglected ?
>


Well, that's one of the points of my website at:

http;//www.geocities.com/Tokyo/Temple/9845/austric.htm


> > There are African YAP+ haplotypes in India, but many Indian haplotypes
> > appear to be of Indian origin.
>
>   On what timescale could such haplotypes arise ? What would be the
> probability of them arising independantly ?

For the later haplotypes the probability would be very small indeed
because at the least you would have to multiply the probabilities of all
the ancestral haplotypes together.


>Also, is there any reason for> the East Asian-African mtDNA similarity ? C.A.Winters postulated an
> Africoid substratum in East Asia, an idea widely dismissed when he first> proposed it on linguistic grounds. Would this research support his thesis
> ? Or did these genes evolve independantly in East Asia ?
>

Of course, in reality there is a somewhat Africoid substratum
everywhere. From the phenotypic standpoint, yes, there was also an
Africoid or "Oceanic Negroid" presence in Asia.

I doubt that mtDNA haplotype M in Africa and Asia are unrelated. The
chances of independent evolution occuring are extremely tiny because
we're speaking of multiple events each dependent on the previous one.

Regards,
Paul Kekai Manansala

--
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